SELF-PORTRAIT

Teacher: Leigh Kermizian

Title: Self-Portrait

Grade Level: 10th-11th

Brief History: A self-portrait is a portrait an artist makes using themselves as its subject, typically drawn or painted from a reflection in a mirror.

Standards:

9.1 Production, Performance and Exhibition of dance, music, theatre and visual arts

9.2 Historical and Cultural Contexts

9.4 Aesthetic Response

Goals: Create a realistic representation of yourself

Objectives:

Demonstrate different shading techniques

Discuss self-portraits of various artists

Create a self-portrait using one of the shading techniques

Requirements: Create a realistic representation of yourself using one shading technique

Resources/Visual Aids:

Exemplar

PowerPoint of important self-portraits

Supplies/Materials:

Mirror

Pencils

Charcoal

Sharpie

Paper

Teacher Prep:

Have supplies ready to distribute

Teaching:

Day One:

Intro:

  • Discuss why artists make self-portraits
  • Compare and contrast different self-portraits in presentation
  • Review and practice shading techniques

Work:

  • Carefully observe yourself in the mirror
  • Select a comfortable spot for you to sit and a comfortable pose
  • Choose a composition that interests you
  • Choose a style of shading
  • Begin drawing

Closing

  • Clean up
  • Discuss progress

Day Two-Seven:

Intro:

  • Review progress of students

Work:

  • Continue work on self-portraits

Closing:

  • Clean up

Day Eight

Intro:

  • Review process of a critique
  • Set up work

Critique:

  • PAFFER

Closing:

  • Clean up
  • Discuss effectiveness of critique

Critique/evaluation/assessment: Students work will be graded based on a rubric that will look at creativity, originality, craftsmanship, and participation. Students will participate in a critique based on the following criteria:

  • Prepare to critique
  • Examine Actual (literal) qualities
  • Examine Functional qualities
  • Examine Formal qualities
  • Examine Expressive qualities
  • Determine Relevant theories

Extension: Students will conduct research on a famous self-portrait of their choosing and analyze.

Time budget:

Day One

Intro: 10 minutes

Work time: 30 minutes

Clean up: 5 minutes

Day Three- Seven

Intro: 5 minutes

Work time: 35 minutes

Clean up: 5 minutes

Day Eight

Intro: 5 minutes

Critique: 35 minutes

Clean up: 5 minutes

Vocabulary:

Portrait:  A work of art that represents a specific person, a group of people, or an animal. Portraits usually show what a person looks like as well as revealing something about the subject’s personality. Portraits can be made of any sculptural material or in any two-dimensional medium. Portraiture is the field of portrait making and portraits in general.

Shading: Showing change from light to dark or dark to light in a picture by darkening areas that would be shadowed and leaving other areas light. Blending of one value into another is sometimes called feathering. Shading is often used to produce illusions of dimension and depth.

Hatching and Cross-Hatching – Creating tonal or shading effects with closely spaced parallel lines. When more such lines are placed at an angle across the first, it is called cross-hatching. Artists use this technique, varying the length, angle, closeness and other qualities of the lines, most commonly in drawing, linear painting, engraving, and ethnic. Hatching is also referred to with the French word hachure.

Stipple: a drawing, painting, or engraving method employing dots rather than lines. Stippled works can be produced with any of a variety of tools, including pencils, crayons, pens, and brushes. see thumbnail to rightThe broadly distributed bristles of this stipple brush are all the same length, allowing the application of a mass of fine dots. A stipple brush is often used by painters of faux textures — simulating granite and sandstone for instance.

Safety Concerns: None

Bibliography/References:

www.artlex.com

SELF

One thought on “SELF-PORTRAIT

  1. Pingback: Self-Portraits | Leigh Kermizian

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